Tag Archives: soil

21Apr/21

Ag Policy and How it Impacts Soil Health Practice Adoption

As part of the Soil Health Nexus Digital Cafe Series, Lara Bryant from the Natural Resources Defense Council, presents “Ag Policy and How it Impacts Soil Health Practice Adoption”. This presentation was originally broadcast on April 21, 2021.

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22Jul/20

Nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium dynamics in a soil health system

As part of the Soil Health Nexus Digital Cafe Series, Matt Fryer of the University of Arkansas hosts a panel discussion soil health and fertility. This presentation was originally broadcast on July 22, 2020. Panelists included:Read More…

04Dec/19

We’re at it Again, New Tool “Drawer” Available: Soil Physical Properties

Soil physical properties, including soil texture and soil structure, have a tremendous influence on its ability to function as a living productive ecosystem that sustains plants, animals, and humans. The Soil Health Nexus has added a new “Drawer” in their Soil Health Toolbox titled, Soil Physical Properties.

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28Sep/18

Maintaining soil fertility is important for soil health

Maintaining soil fertility is important not only for profitable crop production, but also soil health. In a long-term P and K fertility trial, we can see that there is much greater residue cover in plots that have received adequate potash applications over time compared to where no K was applied. Application of P had minimal to no effect on residue cover.

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01Aug/18
A saline-sodic headland along state Highway 5 East roadside ditch in Cavalier County, N.D.

Perennial Salt-Tolerant Covers for Saline-Sodic Headlands in NE North Dakota

Wet weather results in shallow groundwater depths and saturated soils, whereas, dry weather results in lower groundwater depths. Establishing a vegetative cover is the key to utilize excessive soil moisture, intercepting salt-carrying water before it will affect productive areas, reducing evaporation from the soil surface, adding organic material and increasing microbial activity. With time, these headlands might be planted with crops like wheat, canola and corn and soybean again.

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01May/18
Research demonstrates that animal manures can produce both environmental and productivity benefits over the commercial fertilizer it replaces.

Manure’s Impact on Yield, Nitrogen, and Carbon

Manure is often viewed by many as an environmental liability.  However, if manure is applied at rates equal to or less than the nitrogen (N) requirement of a crop, can manure produce environmental benefits over commercial fertilizer?  This was the focus of an Asian research group which summarized the results of 141 published studies from Asia, Europe, and the U.S. comparing manure substitution for fertilizer. This article summarizes the “Take Home Messages” from this research paper.

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